Bulfinch’s Mythology, The Age of Fable

Bulfinch's Mythology, The Age of Fable

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Bulfinch's Mythology, The Age of Fable By Thomas Bulfinch

Format: Global Grey edition

Pages (PDF): 370

Publication Date: 1855

Illustrations: No

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Details:

Pages (PDF): 370

Publication Date: 1855

Illustrations: No

About The Book: The Age of Fable, or Stories of Gods and Heroes is the first part of Bulfinch's Mythology, the other two being The Age of Chivalry, or Legends of King Arthur, and, Legends of Charlemagne, or Romance of the Middle Ages. Chapters include: Prometheus and Pandora; Apollo and Daphne — Pyramus and Thisbe — Cephalus and Procris; Juno and Her Rivals, Io and Callisto — Diana and Actaeon — Latona and the Rustics; Phaeton; Midas — Baucis and Philemon; Proserpine — Glaucus and Scylla; Pygmalion — Dryope — Venus and Adonis — Apollo and Hyacinthus; Ceyx and Halcyone: or, the Halcyon Birds; Vertumnus and Pomona; Cupid and Psyche; Cadmus — The Myrmidons; Nisus and Scylla — Echo and Narcissus — Clytie — Hero and Leander; Minerva — Niobe; The Graeae and Gorgons — Perseus — Medusa — Atlas — Andromeda; Monsters, Giants, Sphinx, Pegasus, and Chimaera, Centaurs, Griffin, and Pygmies; The Golden Fleece — Medea; Meleager and Atalanta; Hercules — Hebe and Ganymede; Theseus — Daedalus — Castor and Pollux; Bacchus — Ariadne; The Rural Deities — Erisichthon — Rhoecus — The Water Deities — The Camenae — The Winds; Achelous and Hercules — Admetus and Alcestis — Antigone — Penelope; Orpheus and Eurydice — Aristaeus — Amphion — Linus — Thamyris — Marsyas — Melampus — Musaeus; Arion — Ibycus — Simonides — Sappho; Endymion — Orion — Aurora and Tithonus — Acis and Galatea; The Trojan War; The Fall of Troy — Return of the Greeks — Agamemnon, Orestes and Electra; Adventures of Ulysses — The Lotus-Eaters — Cyclopse — Circe — Sirens — Scylla and Charybdis — Calypso; The Phaeacians — Fate of the Suitors; Adventures of Aeneas — The Harpies — Dido — Palinurius; The Infernal Regions — The Sibyl; Aeneas in Italy - Camilla — Evander — Nisus and Euryalus — Mezentius — Turnus; Pythagoras — Egyptian Deities — Oracles; Origin of Mythology — Statues of Gods and Goddesses — Poets of Mythology; Modern Monsters — The Phoenix — Basilisk — Unicorn — Salamander; Eastern Mythology. Zoroaster — Hindu Mythology — Castes — Buddha — Grand Lama; Northern Mythology — Valhalla — The Valkyrior; Thor’s Visit to Jotunheim; The Death of Baldur — The Elves — Runic Letters — Skalds — Iceland; The Druids — Iona; Beowulf; and, Proverbial Expressions.


Excerpt:

The religions of ancient Greece and Rome are extinct. The so-called divinities of Olympus have not a single worshipper among living men. They belong now not to the department of theology, but to those of literature and taste. There they still hold their place, and will continue to hold it, for they are too closely connected with the finest productions of poetry and art, both ancient and modern, to pass into oblivion.

We propose to tell the stories relating to them which have come down to us from the ancients, and which are alluded to by modern poets, essayists, and orators. Our readers may thus at the same time be entertained by the most charming fictions which fancy has ever created, and put in possession of information indispensable to every one who would read with intelligence the elegant literature of his own day.

In order to understand these stories, it will be necessary to acquaint ourselves with the ideas of the structure of the universe which prevailed among the Greeks — the people from whom the Romans, and other nations through them, received their science and religion.

The Greeks believed the earth to be flat and circular, their own country occupying the middle of it, the central point being either Mount Olympus, the abode of the gods, or Delphi, so famous for its oracle.

The circular disk of the earth was crossed from west to east and divided into two equal parts by the Sea, as they called the Mediterranean, and its continuation the Euxine, the only seas with which they were acquainted.

Around the earth flowed the River Ocean, its course being from south to north on the western side of the earth, and in a contrary direction on the eastern side. It flowed in a steady, equable current, unvexed by storm or tempest. The sea, and all the rivers on earth, received their waters from it.

The northern portion of the earth was supposed to be inhabited by a happy race named the Hyperboreans, dwelling in everlasting bliss and spring beyond the lofty mountains whose caverns were supposed to send forth the piercing blasts of the north wind, which chilled the people of Hellas (Greece). Their country was inaccessible by land or sea. They lived exempt from disease or old age, from toils and warfare. Moore has given us the “Song of a Hyperborean,” beginning

“I come from a land in the sun-bright deep,
Where golden gardens glow,
Where the winds of the north, becalmed in sleep,
Their conch shells never blow.”

On the south side of the earth, close to the stream of Ocean, dwelt a people happy and virtuous as the Hyperboreans. They were named the Æthiopians. The gods favoured them so highly that they were wont to leave at times their Olympian abodes and go to share their sacrifices and banquets.

On the western margin of the earth, by the stream of Ocean, lay a happy place named the Elysian Plain, whither mortals favoured by the gods were transported without tasting of death, to enjoy an immortality of bliss. This happy region was also called the “Fortunate Fields,” and the “Isles of the Blessed.”

We thus see that the Greeks of the early ages knew little of any real people except those to the east and south of their own country, or near the coast of the Mediterranean. Their imagination meantime peopled the western portion of this sea with giants, monsters, and enchantresses, while they placed around the disk of the earth, which they probably regarded as of no great width, nations enjoying the peculiar favour of the gods, and blessed with happiness and longevity.

The Dawn, the Sun, and the Moon were supposed to rise out of the Ocean, on the eastern side, and to drive through the air, giving light to gods and men. The stars, also, except those forming the Wain or Bear, and others near them, rose the stream of Ocean. There the sun-god embarked in a winged boat, which conveyed him round by the northern part of the earth, back to his place of rising in the east. Milton alludes to this in his “Comus”:

“Now the gilded car of day
His golden axle doth allay
In the steep Atlantic stream,
And the slope Sun his upward beam
Shoots against the dusky pole,
Facing towards the other goal
Of his chamber in the east.”

The abode of the gods was on the summit of Mount Olympus, in Thessaly. A gate of clouds, kept by the godesses named the Seasons, opened to permit the passage of the Celestials to earth, and to receive them on their return. The gods had their separate dwellings; but all, when summoned, repaired to the palace of Jupiter, as did also those deities whose usual abode was the earth, the waters, or the under-world. It was also in the great hall of the palace of the Olympian king that the gods feasted each day on ambrosia and nectar, their food and drink, the latter being handed round by the lovely goddess Hebe. Here they conversed of the affairs of heaven and earth; and as they quaffed their nectar, Apollo, the god of music, delighted them with the tones of his lyre, to which the Muses sang in responsive strains. When the sun was set, the gods retired to sleep in their respective dwellings.

The following lines from the “Odyssey” will show how Homer conceived of Olympus:

“So saying, Minerva, goddess azure-eyed,
Rose to Olympus, the reputed seat
Eternal of the gods, which never storms
Disturb, rains drench, or snow invades, but calm
The expanse and cloudless shines with purest day.
There the inhabitants divine rejoice
For ever.”

Cowper.

The robes and other parts of the dress of the goddesses were woven by Minerva and the Graces, and everything of a more solid nature was formed of the various metals. Vulcan was architect, smith, armourer, chariot builder, and artist of all work in Olympus. He built of brass the houses of the gods; he made for them the golden shoes with which they trod the air or the water, and moved from place to place with the speed of the wind, or even of thought. He also shod with brass the celestial steeds, which whirled the chariots of the gods through the air, or along the surface of the sea. He was able to bestow on his workmanship self-motion, so that the tripods (chairs and tables) could move of themselves in and out of the celestial hall. He even endowed with intelligence the golden handmaidens whom he made to wait on himself.

Jupiter, or Jove (Zeus ), though called the father of gods and men, had himself a beginning. Saturn (Cronos) was his father, and Rhea (Ops) his mother. Saturn and Rhea were of the race of Titans, who were the children of Earth and Heaven, which sprang from Chaos, of which we shall give a further account in our next chapter.

There is another cosmogony, or account of the creation, according to which Earth, Erebus, and Love were the first of beings. Love (Eros) issued from the egg of Night, which floated on Chaos. By his arrows and torch he pierced and vivified all things, producing life and joy.

Saturn and Rhea were not the only Titans. There were others, whose names were Oceanus, Hyperion, Iapetus, and Ophion, males; and Themis, Mnemosyne, Eurynome, females. They are spoken of as the elder gods, whose dominion was afterwards transferred to others. Saturn yielded to Jupiter, Oceanus to Neptune, Hyperion to Apollo. Hyperion was the father of the Sun, Moon, and Dawn. He is therefore the original sun-god, and is painted with the splendour and beauty which were afterwards bestowed on Apollo.

“Hyperion’s curls, the front of Jove himself.”
Shakespeare.

Ophion and Eurynome ruled over Olympus till they were dethroned by Saturn and Rhea. Milton alludes to them in “Paradise Lost.” He says the heathens seem to have had some knowledge of the temptation and fall of man.

“And fabled how the serpent, whom they called
Ophion, with Eurynome, (the wide-
Encroaching Eve perhaps,) had first the rule
Of high Olympus, thence by Saturn driven.”

The representations given of Saturn are not very consistent; for on the one hand his reign is said to have been the golden age of innocence and purity, and on the other he is described as a monster who devoured his children. Jupiter, however, escaped this fate, and when grown up espoused Metis (Prudence), who administered a draught to Saturn which caused him to disgorge his children. Jupiter, with his brothers and sisters, now rebelled against their father Saturn and his brothers the Titans; vanquished them, and imprisoned some of them in Tartarus, inflicting other penalties on others. Atlas was condemned to bear up the heavens on his shoulders.


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