Notice: For only £40 (down from £60), you can get the entire collection of over 3,000 ebooks, including around 900 that are no longer on the site. This offer will be for a limited time only.

↩ Ebooks

Cyrano de Bergerac

Edmond Rostand


Free download available in PDF, epub, and Kindle ebook formats. Skip down page to downloads.

Categories » All ebooks » Drama

See the front cover of this book (image will open in new tab)

Description

Cyrano de Bergerac is a play written in 1897 by Edmond Rostand. Hercule Savinien Cyrano de Bergerac, a cadet in the French Army, is a brash, strong-willed man of many talents. In addition to being a remarkable duelist, he is a gifted, joyful poet and is also shown to be a musician. However, he has an extremely large nose, which is the reason for his own self-doubt. This doubt prevents him from expressing his love for his distant cousin, the beautiful and intellectual heiress Roxane, as he believes that his ugliness denies him the dream of being loved by even an ugly woman.

This book has 177 pages in the PDF version, and was originally published in 1897; this is a translation by Gladys Thomas and Mary F. Guillemard.

Download for ereaders (below donate buttons)

Last week, around 30,000 people downloaded books from my site - 9 people donated. I love offering these books for free, but need some support to continue doing so. Please give a small donation - £1, £2 - anything helps - using the buttons below. You don't need an account and it only takes a minute. (You can also support it by buying one of the collections.)


PDF   ePub   Kindle

Excerpt from 'Cyrano de Bergerac'

The public, arriving by degrees. Troopers, burghers, lackeys, pages, a pickpocket, the doorkeeper, etc., followed by marquises. Cuigy, Brissaille, the buffet-girl, the violinists, etc.   (A confusion of loud voices is heard outside the door. A trooper enters hastily.)

THE DOORKEEPER (following him):  Hollo! You there! Your money! 

THE TROOPER: I enter gratis.

THE DOORKEEPER: Why?

THE TROOPER: Why? I am of the King's Household Cavalry, 'faith!

THE DOORKEEPER (to another trooper who enters): And you?

SECOND TROOPER: I pay nothing.

THE DOORKEEPER: How so?

SECOND TROOPER: I am a musketeer.

FIRST TROOPER (to the second): The play will not begin till two. The pit is empty. Come, a bout with the foils to pass the time.

(They fence with the foils they have brought.)

A LACKEY (entering): Pst. . .Flanquin. . .!

ANOTHER (already there): Champagne?. . .

THE FIRST (showing him cards and dice which he takes from his doublet): See, here be cards and dice. (He seats himself on the floor): Let's play.

THE SECOND (doing the same): Good; I am with you, villain!

FIRST LACKEY (taking from his pocket a candle-end, which he lights, and sticks on the floor): I made free to provide myself with light at my master's expense!

A GUARDSMAN (to a shop-girl who advances): 'Twas prettily done to come before the lights were lit!

(He takes her round the waist.)

ONE OF THE FENCERS (receiving a thrust): A hit!

ONE OF THE CARD-PLAYERS: Clubs!

THE GUARDSMAN (following the girl): A kiss!

THE SHOP-GIRL (struggling to free herself): They're looking!

THE GUARDSMAN (drawing her to a dark corner): No fear! No one can see!

A MAN (sitting on the ground with others, who have brought their provisions): By coming early, one can eat in comfort.

A BURGHER (conducting his son): Let us sit here, son.

A CARD-PLAYER: Triple ace!

A MAN (taking a bottle from under his cloak, and also seating himself on the floor): A tippler may well quaff his Burgundy (he drinks): in the Burgundy Hotel!

THE BURGHER (to his son): 'Faith! A man might think he had fallen in a bad house here! (He points with his cane to the drunkard): What with topers! (ONE OF THE FENCERS in breaking off, jostles him): brawlers! (He stumbles into the midst of the card-players): gamblers!

THE GUARDSMAN (behind him, still teasing the shop-girl): Come, one kiss!

THE BURGHER (hurriedly pulling his son away): By all the holies! And this, my boy, is the theater where they played Rotrou erewhile.

THE YOUNG MAN: Ay, and Corneille!

A TROOP OF PAGES (hand-in-hand, enter dancing the farandole, and singing): Tra' a la, la, la, la, la, la, la, lere. . .

THE DOORKEEPER (sternly, to the pages): You pages there, none of your tricks!. . .

FIRST PAGE (with an air of wounded dignity): Oh, sir!--such a suspicion!. . . (Briskly, to THE SECOND page, the moment the doorkeeper's back is turned): Have you string?

THE SECOND: Ay, and a fish-hook with it.

FIRST PAGE: We can angle for wigs, then, up there i' th' gallery.

A PICKPOCKET (gathering about him some evil-looking youths): Hark ye, young cut-purses, lend an ear, while I give you your first lesson in thieving.

SECOND PAGE (calling up to others in the top galleries): You there! Have you peashooters?

THIRD PAGE (from above): Ay, have we, and peas withal! (He blows, and peppers them with peas.)

THE YOUNG MAN (to his father): What piece do they give us?

THE BURGHER: 'Clorise.'

THE YOUNG MAN: Who may the author be?

THE BURGHER: Master Balthazar Baro. It is a play!. . . (He goes arm-in-arm with his son.)

THE PICKPOCKET (to his pupils): Have a care, above all, of the lace knee-ruffles--cut them off!

More free ebooks

cover page for the Global Grey edition of Persuasion by Jane Austen
Persuasion

Jane Austen

cover page for the Global Grey edition of The Cavalier by George Washington Cable
The Cavalier

George Washington Cable

cover page for the Global Grey edition of The Black Arrow by Robert Louis Stevenson
The Black Arrow

Robert Louis Stevenson

cover page for the Global Grey edition of The Black Tulip by Alexandre Dumas
The Black Tulip

Alexandre Dumas

Back to the top ↑