Home Categories Recent Authors Lists Series Collections Donate About Contact F.A.Q Search
The Forsyte Saga By John Galsworthy

The Forsyte Saga

John Galsworthy


Available as PDF, epub, and Kindle ebook downloads.
This book has 643 pages in the PDF version, and was originally published in 1906-1921.


Description

The Forsyte Saga is a book by John Galsworthy, first published between 1906 and 1921. It contains three novels and two interludes. It is the start of a trilogy of books that continues with 'A Modern Comedy', and ends with 'End of the Chapter'. The novels in this book are The Man of Property, In Chancery, and, To Let. The two interludes are 'Indian Summer of a Forsyte', and, 'Awakening'. As a whole, the novels follow the lives of a large upper-middle-class English family, particularly the main character, Soames Forsyte. In the first book, The Man of Property, the reader is introduced to the family and also to Soames' desire to own things, including his wife, whom he wishes to move away to a house away from her friends. His wife, resisting this, falls in love with someone else, with tragic consequences. In the second book, In Chancery, the subject is the marital discord of both Soames, and his sister, as they take steps to divorce their spouses. In the final novel of this book, To Let, the Forsyte saga is concluded with forbidden relationships, new ones beginning, and old ones ending, and with Soames realising that for all his attempts, he never really possessed anything he truly wanted.

Free ebook downloads (below donate buttons)

Last week about 30,000 people downloaded from the site, and 7 people donated. I run this site entirely on my own - I want to be able to continue offering these books for free, but need some support to do that. If you can, please make a small donation - any amount is appreciated. Thank you! You can also support the site by buying a collection, such as the Fiction (General) one, with 100 ebooks for only £7.00



PDF   ePub   Kindle

Follow Global Grey on Facebook or Twitter

Production notes: This edition of The Forsyte Saga was published by Global Grey ebooks on the 22nd March 2021. The artwork used for the cover is 'Gustav Fredrikson' by Robert Lundberg.

Excerpt from 'The Forsyte Saga'

Those privileged to be present at a family festival of the Forsytes have seen that charming and instructive sight—an upper middle-class family in full plumage. But whosoever of these favoured persons has possessed the gift of psychological analysis (a talent without monetary value and properly ignored by the Forsytes), has witnessed a spectacle, not only delightful in itself, but illustrative of an obscure human problem. In plainer words, he has gleaned from a gathering of this family—no branch of which had a liking for the other, between no three members of whom existed anything worthy of the name of sympathy—evidence of that mysterious concrete tenacity which renders a family so formidable a unit of society, so clear a reproduction of society in miniature. He has been admitted to a vision of the dim roads of social progress, has understood something of patriarchal life, of the swarmings of savage hordes, of the rise and fall of nations. He is like one who, having watched a tree grow from its planting—a paragon of tenacity, insulation, and success, amidst the deaths of a hundred other plants less fibrous, sappy, and persistent—one day will see it flourishing with bland, full foliage, in an almost repugnant prosperity, at the summit of its efflorescence.

On June 15, eighteen eighty-six, about four of the afternoon, the observer who chanced to be present at the house of old Jolyon Forsyte in Stanhope Gate, might have seen the highest efflorescence of the Forsytes.

This was the occasion of an “at home” to celebrate the engagement of Miss June Forsyte, old Jolyon’s granddaughter, to Mr. Philip Bosinney. In the bravery of light gloves, buff waistcoats, feathers and frocks, the family were present, even Aunt Ann, who now but seldom left the corner of her brother Timothy’s green drawing-room, where, under the aegis of a plume of dyed pampas grass in a light blue vase, she sat all day reading and knitting, surrounded by the effigies of three generations of Forsytes. Even Aunt Ann was there; her inflexible back, and the dignity of her calm old face personifying the rigid possessiveness of the family idea.

When a Forsyte was engaged, married, or born, the Forsytes were present; when a Forsyte died—but no Forsyte had as yet died; they did not die; death being contrary to their principles, they took precautions against it, the instinctive precautions of highly vitalized persons who resent encroachments on their property.

About the Forsytes mingling that day with the crowd of other guests, there was a more than ordinarily groomed look, an alert, inquisitive assurance, a brilliant respectability, as though they were attired in defiance of something. The habitual sniff on the face of Soames Forsyte had spread through their ranks; they were on their guard.

The subconscious offensiveness of their attitude has constituted old Jolyon’s “home” the psychological moment of the family history, made it the prelude of their drama.

The Forsytes were resentful of something, not individually, but as a family; this resentment expressed itself in an added perfection of raiment, an exuberance of family cordiality, an exaggeration of family importance, and—the sniff. Danger—so indispensable in bringing out the fundamental quality of any society, group, or individual—was what the Forsytes scented; the premonition of danger put a burnish on their armour. For the first time, as a family, they appeared to have an instinct of being in contact, with some strange and unsafe thing.

Over against the piano a man of bulk and stature was wearing two waistcoats on his wide chest, two waistcoats and a ruby pin, instead of the single satin waistcoat and diamond pin of more usual occasions, and his shaven, square, old face, the colour of pale leather, with pale eyes, had its most dignified look, above his satin stock. This was Swithin Forsyte. Close to the window, where he could get more than his fair share of fresh air, the other twin, James—the fat and the lean of it, old Jolyon called these brothers—like the bulky Swithin, over six feet in height, but very lean, as though destined from his birth to strike a balance and maintain an average, brooded over the scene with his permanent stoop; his grey eyes had an air of fixed absorption in some secret worry, broken at intervals by a rapid, shifting scrutiny of surrounding facts; his cheeks, thinned by two parallel folds, and a long, clean-shaven upper lip, were framed within Dundreary whiskers. In his hands he turned and turned a piece of china. Not far off, listening to a lady in brown, his only son Soames, pale and well-shaved, dark-haired, rather bald, had poked his chin up sideways, carrying his nose with that aforesaid appearance of “sniff,” as though despising an egg which he knew he could not digest. Behind him his cousin, the tall George, son of the fifth Forsyte, Roger, had a Quilpish look on his fleshy face, pondering one of his sardonic jests. Something inherent to the occasion had affected them all.

Seated in a row close to one another were three ladies—Aunts Ann, Hester (the two Forsyte maids), and Juley (short for Julia), who not in first youth had so far forgotten herself as to marry Septimus Small, a man of poor constitution. She had survived him for many years. With her elder and younger sister she lived now in the house of Timothy, her sixth and youngest brother, on the Bayswater Road. Each of these ladies held fans in their hands, and each with some touch of colour, some emphatic feather or brooch, testified to the solemnity of the opportunity.

In the centre of the room, under the chandelier, as became a host, stood the head of the family, old Jolyon himself. Eighty years of age, with his fine, white hair, his dome-like forehead, his little, dark grey eyes, and an immense white moustache, which drooped and spread below the level of his strong jaw, he had a patriarchal look, and in spite of lean cheeks and hollows at his temples, seemed master of perennial youth. He held himself extremely upright, and his shrewd, steady eyes had lost none of their clear shining. Thus he gave an impression of superiority to the doubts and dislikes of smaller men. Having had his own way for innumerable years, he had earned a prescriptive right to it. It would never have occurred to old Jolyon that it was necessary to wear a look of doubt or of defiance.

More free ebooks

cover page for the Global Grey edition of A Modern Comedy by John Galsworthy
A Modern Comedy

John Galsworthy

cover page for the Global Grey edition of Cato, a Tragedy by Joseph Addison
Cato, a Tragedy

Joseph Addison

cover page for the Global Grey edition of Four-Day Planet by H. Beam Piper
Four-Day Planet

H. Beam Piper

cover page for the Global Grey edition of Mrs. Warren's Profession by George Bernard Shaw
Mrs. Warren's Profession

George Bernard Shaw



⇧ Back to top