Home Categories Recent Authors Lists Series Collections Donate About Contact F.A.Q Search
The World Set Free By H. G. Wells

The World Set Free

H. G. Wells


Available as PDF, epub, and Kindle ebook downloads.
This book has 111 pages in the PDF version, and was originally published in 1914.


Description

The World Set Free is a novel by H. G. Wells, first published in 1914. Continuing a theme of Wells's work - that of the history of technological advancement by humans, The World Set Free tells of a war fought with the most destructive weapon the world has ever seen - an atomic bomb. The novel's solution to the threat of these weapons is a one world government. Set in motion by the King of Britain, very few of the leaders of the world resist, and those that do are defeated. Thereafter, there is a creation of a utopian society, and with atomic energy solving the problem of work, the vast majority of the population are artists.

H. G. Wells knew a little about atomic physics from reading the works of scientists such as William Ramsay, Ernest Rutherford, and Frederick Soddy. Physicist Leó Szilárd read the book in 1932, the same year the neutron was discovered.

Free ebook downloads (below donate buttons)

Last week about 25,000 people downloaded from the site, and 5 people donated. I run this site entirely on my own - I want to be able to continue offering these books for free, but need some support to do that. If you can, please make a small donation - any amount is appreciated. Thank you! You can also support the site by buying a collection, such as the Fiction (General) one, with 100 ebooks for only £7.00



PDF   ePub   Kindle

Follow Global Grey on Facebook or Twitter

Production notes: This edition of The World Set Free was published by Global Grey ebooks on the 2nd March 2021. The artwork used for the cover is 'We are Making a New World' by Paul Nash.

Random Piece of Information: Re-watching 'Lost' in the background as I do this. Feeling very tired today - I want a cup of tea, but too lazy to get up and make one :/

Thoughts whilst doing this book: An interesting concept. H. G. Wells was something of a feminist and there's a dialogue in the last chapter that I particularly liked about how women should stop seeing themselves in relation to men and instead see themselves 'in relation to the sun and stars'.

Excerpt from 'The World Set Free'

The history of mankind is the history of the attainment of external power. Man is the tool-using, fire-making animal. From the outset of his terrestrial career we find him supplementing the natural strength and bodily weapons of a beast by the heat of burning and the rough implement of stone. So he passed beyond the ape. From that he expands. Presently he added to himself the power of the horse and the ox, he borrowed the carrying strength of water and the driving force of the wind, he quickened his fire by blowing, and his simple tools, pointed first with copper and then with iron, increased and varied and became more elaborate and efficient. He sheltered his heat in houses and made his way easier by paths and roads. He complicated his social relationships and increased his efficiency by the division of labour. He began to store up knowledge. Contrivance followed contrivance, each making it possible for a man to do more. Always down the lengthening record, save for a set-back ever and again, he is doing more.... A quarter of a million years ago the utmost man was a savage, a being scarcely articulate, sheltering in holes in the rocks, armed with a rough-hewn flint or a fire-pointed stick, naked, living in small family groups, killed by some younger man so soon as his first virile activity declined. Over most of the great wildernesses of earth you would have sought him in vain; only in a few temperate and sub-tropical river valleys would you have found the squatting lairs of his little herds, a male, a few females, a child or so.

He knew no future then, no kind of life except the life he led. He fled the cave-bear over the rocks full of iron ore and the promise of sword and spear; he froze to death upon a ledge of coal; he drank water muddy with the clay that would one day make cups of porcelain; he chewed the ear of wild wheat he had plucked and gazed with a dim speculation in his eyes at the birds that soared beyond his reach. Or suddenly he became aware of the scent of another male and rose up roaring, his roars the formless precursors of moral admonitions. For he was a great individualist, that original, he suffered none other than himself.

So through the long generations, this heavy precursor, this ancestor of all of us, fought and bred and perished, changing almost imperceptibly.

Yet he changed. That keen chisel of necessity which sharpened the tiger’s claw age by age and fined down the clumsy Orchippus to the swift grace of the horse, was at work upon him—is at work upon him still. The clumsier and more stupidly fierce among him were killed soonest and oftenest; the finer hand, the quicker eye, the bigger brain, the better balanced body prevailed; age by age, the implements were a little better made, the man a little more delicately adjusted to his possibilities. He became more social; his herd grew larger; no longer did each man kill or drive out his growing sons; a system of taboos made them tolerable to him, and they revered him alive and soon even after he was dead, and were his allies against the beasts and the rest of mankind. (But they were forbidden to touch the women of the tribe, they had to go out and capture women for themselves, and each son fled from his stepmother and hid from her lest the anger of the Old Man should be roused. All the world over, even to this day, these ancient inevitable taboos can be traced.) And now instead of caves came huts and hovels, and the fire was better tended and there were wrappings and garments; and so aided, the creature spread into colder climates, carrying food with him, storing food—until sometimes the neglected grass-seed sprouted again and gave a first hint of agriculture.

And already there were the beginnings of leisure and thought.

Man began to think. There were times when he was fed, when his lusts and his fears were all appeased, when the sun shone upon the squatting-place and dim stirrings of speculation lit his eyes. He scratched upon a bone and found resemblance and pursued it and began pictorial art, moulded the soft, warm clay of the river brink between his fingers, and found a pleasure in its patternings and repetitions, shaped it into the form of vessels, and found that it would hold water. He watched the streaming river, and wondered from what bountiful breast this incessant water came; he blinked at the sun and dreamt that perhaps he might snare it and spear it as it went down to its resting-place amidst the distant hills. Then he was roused to convey to his brother that once indeed he had done so—at least that some one had done so—he mixed that perhaps with another dream almost as daring, that one day a mammoth had been beset; and therewith began fiction—pointing a way to achievement—and the august prophetic procession of tales.

For scores and hundreds of centuries, for myriads of generations that life of our fathers went on. From the beginning to the ripening of that phase of human life, from the first clumsy eolith of rudely chipped flint to the first implements of polished stone, was two or three thousand centuries, ten or fifteen thousand generations. So slowly, by human standards, did humanity gather itself together out of the dim intimations of the beast. And that first glimmering of speculation, that first story of achievement, that story-teller bright-eyed and flushed under his matted hair, gesticulating to his gaping, incredulous listener, gripping his wrist to keep him attentive, was the most marvellous beginning this world has ever seen. It doomed the mammoths, and it began the setting of that snare that shall catch the sun.

More free ebooks



⇧ Back to top