Notice: For only £40 (down from £60), you can get the entire collection of over 3,000 ebooks, including around 900 that are no longer on the site. This offer will be for a limited time only.

↩ Ebooks

Theaetetus

Plato


Free download available in PDF, epub, and Kindle ebook formats. Skip down page to downloads.

Categories » All ebooks » Classics » Philosophy

See the front cover of this book (image will open in new tab)

Description

Theaetetus is one of Plato's dialogues concerning the nature of knowledge, written circa 369 BC. In this dialogue, Socrates and Theaetetus discuss three definitions of knowledge: knowledge as nothing but perception, knowledge as true judgement, and, finally, knowledge as a true judgement with an account. Each of these definitions is shown to be unsatisfactory. The dialogue is framed by a brief scene in which Euclides tells his friend Terpsion that he has a written record of a dialogue between Socrates and Theaetetus, which occurred when Theaetetus was quite a young man. This dialogue is then read aloud to the two men by a slave boy in the employ of Euclides.

Part of the Encyclopaedia Britannica’s Great Books of the Western World set.

This book has 95 pages in the PDF version. This translation by Benjamin Jowett was originally published in 1871.

Download for ereaders (below donate buttons)

Last week, around 33,000 people downloaded books from my site - 9 people donated. I really need your help to keep this site running. Please give a small donation - £1, $1 - anything helps. You don't need a PayPal or Stripe account and it only takes a minute.
The buttons below are set in British Pounds currency - click here if you would prefer to donate in USD


PDF   ePub   Kindle

Excerpt from 'Theaetetus'

Persons of the dialogue: Socrates; Theodorus; Theaetetus

Scene: Euclid and Terpsion meet in front of Euclid's house in Megara; they enter the house, and the dialogue is read to them by a servant.


Euclid. Have you only just arrived from the country, Terpsion?

Terpsion. No, I came some time ago: and I have been in the Agora looking for you, and wondering that I could not find you.

Euclid. But I was not in the city.

Terpsion. Where then?

Euclid. As I was going down to the harbour, I met Theaetetus-he was being carried up to Athens from the army at Corinth.

Terpsion. Was he alive or dead?

Euclid. He was scarcely alive, for he has been badly wounded; but he was suffering even more from the sickness which has broken out in the army.

Terpsion. The dysentery, you mean?

Euclid. Yes.

Terpsion. Alas! what a loss he will be!

Euclid. Yes, Terpsion, he is a noble fellow; only to-day I heard some people highly praising his behaviour in this very battle.

Terpsion. No wonder; I should rather be surprised at hearing anything else of him. But why did he go on, instead of stopping at Megara?

More free ebooks

Back to the top ↑