The Future Life as Described and Portrayed by Spirits

The Future Life as Described and Portrayed by Spirits

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The Future Life as Described and Portrayed by Spirits By Elizabeth Sweet

Format: Scanned PDF

Pages (PDF): 412

Publication Date: 1870

Illustrations: No

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Details:

Pages (PDF): 412

Publication Date: 1870

Illustrations: No

About The Book: From the Introduction: AT an early period of my investigations into spiritual intercourse, when I was but an inquirer and by no means a believer, I was invited to join a circle which had weekly meetings at the house of Mrs. Fish, the eldest of the Fox family. I accepted the invitation, and met there some five or six persons, male and female, all strangers to me. After a few meetings, Mrs. Fish introduced two new members to the circle, Mr. and Mrs. Gilbert Sweet, alike strangers to me. They were very quiet and unobtrusive in their manners, and I soon discovered that they were very earnest and honest seekers after the truth. But I had no idea, nor had they, that there was any mediumship about either of them. At that time, my official duties compelled me to be ab sent from the city one month out of every three. On one occasion, when I returned from such an absence, I was informed at the next meeting of our circle, that Mrs. Sweet had begun to be developed as a medium. The fact itself, and the manner in which it was told to me, interested me at once.


Excerpt:

I SAW a beautiful city afar off, and the name of that city was "Holy" The entrance therein was through a massive gate, and on either side stood an angel, around whose head was a soft halo of radiance, like unto the sun when fleecy clouds have softened the brilliancy of his ray; and their countenances were fair and beauti fully serene with a pure and holy love, and they ever sang the hymn, "Holiness to the Lord."

The angels who guarded that gate were called Constance and Truth, and many people were passing in and out. Some were clad in bright raiments and had radiant faces. Some had a lowly and downcast mien, and before they entered the gate were casting imploring looks, with this expression on their faces, "May I enter?" Some strode along tall and majestically, their heads erect and their faces earnest, as if in pursuit of some great treasure to be obtained when they should enter that gate. Some were loitering in the path, and gazing wishfully as though afraid to approach. Some were trembling, and tears bedewed their cheeks, and they looked on one another saying, "Shall we approach ? we shall not be permitted to enter." Little children were traveling there hand in hand, and none of these emotions did I observe on their innocent faces. Carelessly and hopefully, brightly and lovingly, they loitered along, and their little faces seemed glad with delight as they approached that beautiful gate, and gazed on those beautiful guards which kept the entrance. They did not ask, "May I enter?" but they entered. The guards smiled, and the smile struck me as an exceedingly happy one. But why the careless, happy laugh of childhood should make them seem happier at the unconcern with which those little ones entered, was more than I could fathom. It struck me as remarkable. Much more important seemed the entrance of those people of full growth and developed minds, and yet how different, how varied were the emotions which, each countenance, each walk, each manner and mien, and whole expression together betrayed, while passing before my vision.

I also reached the entrance, and was permitted to enter ; not, however, before I had asked one of the keepers the meaning of so much apparent incongruity of character exhibited by the concourse which had passed before me. The guards said, "Enter, and see for thyself with thine own eyes, and thine own eyes shall convince thee;" and I entered.

I noticed in that vast city, that those whose faces were so radiant with joy and happiness, had come from a far-off country, to show the new-comers the localities, pursuits, and customs, and requirements of the country which they were now going to inhabit. And I ob served that those who had entered with so lofty a port and imposing a mien, with head so erect, so elevated, wore a disappointed look at the barrenness of the country. They had expected to be kings and masters, and to feed on the fat of the land. They did not seem to find the palaces, the luxurious dwellings made ready to receive them, which they had expected to find, and it seemed to me as though hastily-constructed palacet of happiness, before setting out for this country, had been suddenly overthrown. They looked lost, disap pointed, jealous. They did not ask, "What shall I do?" but they asked "How is this? This is not the heaven to which we expected to come. It is a cold, barren, gloomy place ; nothing genial or bright to feast the eye or please the soul. Why, we were led to expect a far different place from this. This surely can not be the heaven we were so often told was prepared for us." They seemed to fold their hands and stand in mute despair. They looked neither to the right nor the left, but there they stood, and gazed as it were on vacancy and hopelessness. How dark and bleak it seemed to them !


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