The Book of Witches

The Book of Witches

Oliver Madox Hueffer

Chapters include: On A Possible Revival Of Witchcraft; A Sabbath-General; The Origins Of The Witch; The Half-Way Worlds; The Witch’s Attributes; Some Representative English Witches; The Witch Of Antiquity; The Witch In Greece And Rome; From Paganism To Christianity; The Witch-Bull And Its Effects; The Later Persecutions In England…

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The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits

The Certainty of the Worlds of Spirits

Richard Baxter

The Certainty of the World of the Spirits. Fully evinced by the unquestionable Histories of Apparitions and Witchcrafts, Operations, Voices, and Proving the Immortality of Souls, the Malice and Misery of the Devils, and the Damned, and the Blessedness of the Justified. Written for the Conviction of Sadduces and Infidels.

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Daemonologie

Daemonologie

King James The First

The first text presented here, written by James I of England, is a wide-ranging discussion of witchcraft, necromancy, possession, demons, were-wolves, fairies and ghosts, in the form of a Socratic dialogue. The second text is a sensational historical account of Scottish witch persecution. The English used is old style English which makes for rather hard reading, but it’s a fascinating book if you can get used to that.

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Demonology And Devil-Lore, Volume 2

Demonology And Devil-Lore, Volume 2

Moncure Daniel Conway

This illustrated book from the late 19th Century, covers a wide range of subjects concerning the devil and demonology in general. The author makes his way through the old Persian devil, Hindu ideas of demons, the Jewish Elohim, Lilith, Ancient Greece, wars in the heavens and on earth, Satan, the sin of man, the curse of knowledge, witchcraft, Faust, and the antichrist. A truly fascinating book.

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An History of Magic, Witchcraft, and Animal Magnetism, Volume 1

An History of Magic, Witchcraft, and Animal Magnetism, Volume 1

John Campbell Colquhoun

From the Preface: “There is no term, perhaps, which has been more frequently and more grossly abused and misapplied than that of Science. The word, in its proper and legitimate sense, unquestionably denotes something known, or, at least, something worthy of being known; and it is generally, and most correctly, employed to denote a series of combined facts which tend to establish a certain general law, or series of laws, of Nature, either…

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