Bulfinch’s Mythology, The Age of Fable

Bulfinch's Mythology, The Age of Fable

Thomas Bulfinch

The Age of Fable, or Stories of Gods and Heroes is the first part of Bulfinch’s Mythology, the other two being The Age of Chivalry, or Legends of King Arthur, and, Legends of Charlemagne, or Romance of the Middle Ages. Chapters include: Prometheus and Pandora; Apollo and Daphne — Pyramus and Thisbe — Cephalus and Procris; Juno and Her Rivals, Io and Callisto — Diana and Actaeon — Latona and the Rustics…

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The Kalevala

The Kalevala

John Martin Crawford

The Kalevala or The Kalewala is a 19th-century work of epic poetry compiled by Elias Lönnrot from Karelian and Finnish oral folklore and mythology. It is regarded as the national epic of Karelia and Finland and is one of the most significant works of Finnish literature.

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Eskimo Folk-Tales

Eskimo Folk-Tales

Knud Rasmussen

This is a collection of 52 folk-tales including; The Two Friends Who Set Off To Travel Round The World; The Coming Of Men, A Long, Long While Ago; Nukúnguasik, Who Escaped From The Tupilak; Qujâvârssuk; Kúnigseq; The Woman Who Had A Bear As A Foster-Son; Ímarasugssuaq, Who Ate His Wives; Qalagánguasê, Who Passed To The Land Of Ghosts; Isigâligârssik, and more.

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Magic Songs of the West Finns, Volume 1

Magic Songs of the West Finns, Volume 1

John Abercromby

This is the first volume of John Abercromby’s extensive study of Finnish magic songs and their background. First he details the history, ethnography and linguistics of the Finns, indeed, constructs a century-long history of the entire Finno-ugric group from the evolution of vocabulary. Finally in the last (long) chapter he gets to the first part of the exposition of the ‘magic songs.’ This is a summary of the various characters…

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The Prose Edda of Snorri Sturlson

The Prose Edda of Snorri Sturlson

Arthur Gilchrist Brodeur

The Prose Edda, also known as the Younger Edda, Snorri’s Edda or simply Edda, is an Old Norse work of literature written in Iceland in the early 13th century. Together with the Poetic Edda, it comprises the major store of Scandinavian mythology. The work is often assumed to have been written, or at least compiled, by the Icelandic scholar and historian…

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Gisli the Outlaw

Gisli the Outlaw

George Webbe Dasent

A story of cyclic blood-revenge, set off by a casual overheard remark, leading to the protagonist, Gisli, becoming a fugitive from society, and eventually dying in single combat against a dozen foes. Set during the introduction of Christianity to Iceland, there are numerous details about pagan practices which are dotted through the narrative…

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The Story of Burnt Njal

The Story of Burnt Njal

George Webbe Dasent

Njáls saga or ‘The Story of Burnt Njáll’ is a 13th century Icelandic saga that describes events between 960 and 1020. It deals with the process of blood feuds in the Icelandic Commonwealth, showing how the requirements of honor could lead to minor slights spiralling into destructive and prolonged bloodshed. The principal characters…

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The Danish History

The Danish History

Saxo Grammaticus

Originally written in Latin in the early years of the 13th Century A.D. by the Danish historian Saxo, of whom little is known except his name. The text of this edition is based on that published as “The Nine Books of the Danish History of Saxo Grammaticus”, translated by Oliver Elton (1905). Although Saxo wrote 16 books of his “Danish History”, only the first nine were ever translated.

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The Laxdaela Saga

The Laxdaela Saga

Muriel Press

The Laxdaela Saga is one of the Icelanders’ sagas. Written in the 13th century, it tells of people in the Breiðafjörður area of Iceland from the late 9th century to the early 11th century. The saga particularly focuses on a love triangle between Guðrún Ósvífrsdóttir, Kjartan Ólafsson and Bolli Þorleiksson. Kjartan and Bolli grow up together…

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The Story of Sigurd the Volsung

The Story of Sigurd the Volsung

William Morris

Son of King Sigmund, young Sigurd is taught the ways of kings by the ancient, mysterious Regin – who then sets him upon the seemingly impossible task: to steal the divine armor guarded by the Wallower on the Gold – the great serpent Fafnir. Astride the war-steed Grayfell and armed with a sword named the Wrath of Sigurd, the young hero crosses the Glittering Heath in pursuit of peril, glory – and the Treasure…

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Famous Men of the Middle Ages

Famous Men of the Middle Ages

John Henry Haaren

This book contains short biographies of famous men from the middle ages such as: Alaric The Visigoth; Attila The Hun; Justinian The Great; Mohammed; Charlemagne; William The Conqueror; Canute The Great; Robert Bruce; Marco Polo, and many more. Aimed at older children, but still holds many interesting facts that will entertain adult readers too.

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The Life and Death of Cormac the Skald

The Life and Death of Cormac the Skald

W. G. Collingwood And J. Stefansson

Kormaks saga is one of the Icelandic sagas. It tells of the tenth-century Icelandic poet, Kormakr Ogmundarson, and Steingeror, the love of his life. The saga preserves a significant amount of poetry attributed to Kormakr, much of it dealing with his love for Steingeror. The saga is believed to have been among the earliest sagas composed.

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