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Achomawi and Atsugewi Tales and Achomawi Myths

Achomawi and Atsugewi Tales and Achomawi Myths

Roland B. Dixon

A short collection of tales and myths of the Achomawi and Atsugewi, who lived in the north-eastern Sierra Nevada of California. Chapters include; Creation Myth (Achomawi); The Making Of Daylight (Achomawi); Hawk-Man (Achomawi); Search For Fire (Achomawi); Loon-Woman (Achomawi); The Lost Brother (Achomawi); Bluejay And Lizard And The Grizzly-Bears (Achomawi); Silver-Fox And Coyote (Achomawi); The Mole And The Sun (Achomawi)…

The Algonquin Legends of New England

The Algonquin Legends of New England

Charles G. Leland

Illustrated. This is Charles Lelands’ able retelling of the Algonquin mythology, particularly tales of the culture hero, Glooskap. Parts include; Glooskap The Divinity; The Merry Tales of Lox, The Mischief Maker; The Amazing Adventures of Master Rabbit; The Chenoo Legends; Thunder Stories; At-o-sis, the Serpent; The Partridge; The Invisible One; Story…

American Indian Fairy Tales

American Indian Fairy Tales

Margaret Compton

Fully illustrated. This is a collection of Native American folklore, retold for children and young adults, over a century ago. Chapters include: The Story-Teller Himself; Snowbird And The Water-Tiger; The Coyote Or Prairie Wolf; How Mad Buffalo Fought The Thunder-Bird; The Red Swan; The Bended Rocks; White Hawk, The Lazy; The Magic Feather; The…

American Indian Freemasonry

American Indian Freemasonry

Arthur C. Parker

Originally published in 1919, this is a short book which states that the Native Americans have a form of Freemasonry amongst them.

Apu Ollantay

Apu Ollantay

Clements Markham

This is the tale of Ollantay, a noble commoner who defies the Inca because of his love for the princess Cusi Coyllor, and thereby puts the empire into a state of rebellion. Ollantay combines tragedy and comedy, and has a vivid cast of male and female characters. This translation by Clements Markham follows the original closely and is very readable.

The Autobiography of a Winnebago Indian

The Autobiography of a Winnebago Indian

Paul Radin

A truly fascinating ethno-biography of an Indian man from the Winnebago tribe. Split into two parts and heavily footnoted. Part One deals with the life of the man as he is growing up in his tribe. He recalls the trouble he got into, his experiences with peyote, his conversion, his time in prison and much more. Part Two contain the teachings of his father…

Chinigchinich

Chinigchinich

Friar Geronimo Boscana

Chinigchinich is an ethnographic account of the culture and religious beliefs of the native Californians in the vicinity of the famous mission San Juan Capistrano. Boscana was a bigot and a racist (he describes the Indians as being like monkeys). However, he lived among them for decades and obviously had an inquisitive mind and a…

The Code of Handsome Lake, the Seneca Prophet

The Code of Handsome Lake, the Seneca Prophet

Arthur C. Parker

Handsome Lake (1735-1815) was a religious reformer among the Iroquois, the prominent alliance of New York tribes. His ‘Code’, presented in this book in full, attempted to simplify the spiritual practices of the Iroquois, preaching temperance, a strict moral code, and self-determination. It also contains some startling prophecies…

Coos Texts

Coos Texts

Leo J. Frachtenberg

This is a short collection of texts from the Coos people of Oregon, collected by anthropologists a century ago. This includes origin myths and lore about what lies beyond the sky and death, tales of people who marry anthropomorphic animals, and legends about natural disasters such as floods and fires.

Creation Myths of Primitive America

Creation Myths of Primitive America

Jeremiah Curtin

Despite the title, which suggests that this is a comprehensive study of Native American creation myths, this is actually a very good set of animal myths from two tribes of California, the Wintu and Yana. These tribes inhabited the northern Central Valley; the Yana are closely related to the Yahi, the tribe of Ishi, the ‘last wild Indian’. Also…

The Culture of the Luiseño Indians

The Culture of the Luiseño Indians

Philip Stedman Sparkman

This is a study of the Luiseño people, who resided in the approximate area of Orange County in California. The book was published after the authors death, and it covers things such as Puberty Ceremonies, Bows And Arrows, Gums, Dyes, And Paint, Fishing, Clothing, Pottery, Shamanism, Government, and Marriage.

Dancing Gods, Indian Ceremonials of New Mexico and Arizona

Erna Fergusson

This is a first person look at a wide range of Pueblo, Hopi, Navajo, Zuñ, and Apache ceremonials in the late 1920s. This book is both an ethnographic document and a classic of Southwestern literature. A well researched and sympathetic book, and remarkably free of attitudes patronizing or idealizing Native Americans.

The Dawn of the World

C. Hart Merriam

The Dawn Of The World, Myths And Weird Tales Told By The Mewan [Miwok] Indians Of California, has an Introduction and 2 Parts. Part 1 covers Ancient Myths, and Part 2 covers Present Day Myths.

Eskimo Folk-Tales

Eskimo Folk-Tales

Knud Rasmussen

With 12 illustrations, this is a collection of 52 folk-tales including; The Two Friends Who Set Off To Travel Round The World; The Coming Of Men, A Long, Long While Ago; Nukúnguasik, Who Escaped From The Tupilak; Qujâvârssuk; Kúnigseq; The Woman Who Had A Bear As A Foster-Son; Ímarasugssuaq, Who Ate His Wives; Qalagánguasê, Who Passed…

Ethnography of the Cahuilla Indians

Ethnography of the Cahuilla Indians

Alfred L. Kroeber

With 15 Plates. This is a short ethnography of the Cahuilla, who inhabited the desert of Southern California. This mostly covers material culture. Chapters include: Geography; Culture; Basketry; Stone Implements; Pottery; Implements of Wood and Fibre; Ceremonial Objects and Beads; Houses; and, Social and Religious Life.

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