Told at the Feis: Stories of Ancient Ireland

Told at the Feis: Stories of Ancient Ireland

Unknown

Chapters include: The Plains of the Towers; Lowry The Voyager; Baile Mac Buain; Ahirney The Satirist; The Story of Mac Daho’s Pig; The Death of King Connor Mac Nessa; Beal Cu and Conall Karnah; The Death of Cuchulainn; The Chase of Slieve Gullion; The Rowan-Tree Mansion; The Legend of Lough Finn; Donnbo; Finnachta the Festive; The Voyage of the O’Corras; Queen Gormley; The Goban Saor; How Monover Died; The Widow’s Daughter; and, The Three Questions.

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The Knight in the Panther’s Skin

The Knight in the Panther's Skin

Shot’ha Rust’haveli

The Knight in the Panther’s Skin is a Georgian medieval epic poem, written in the 12th century by Georgia’s national poet Shota Rustaveli. A definitive work of the Georgian Golden Age, the poem consists of over 1600 Rustavelian Quatrains and is considered to be a “masterpiece of the Georgian literature”. Until the early 20th century, a copy of this poem was part of the dowry of any bride. The poem takes place in the fictional…

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Idylls of the King

Idylls of the King

Alfred Tennyson

Fully illustrated by Gustave Doré. Idylls of the King, published between 1859 and 1885, is a cycle of twelve narrative poems by the English poet Alfred, Lord Tennyson (1809–1892; Poet Laureate from 1850) which retells the legend of King Arthur, his knights, his love for Guinevere and her tragic betrayal of him, and the rise and fall of Arthur’s kingdom. Chapters include: The Coming Of Arthur; Gareth And Lynette; The Marriage Of…

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Forty-four Turkish Fairy Tales

Forty-four Turkish Fairy Tales

Ignácz Kúnos

This book draws on the rich folklore of Turkey with forty-four Turkish Fairy Tales. Most of these stories are framed by the usual fairy tale apparatus. There are quests to win the hand of a princess, evil step-relations, talking animals, magical objects and transformations, simple (but brave) peasants, wizards and witches, dragons and dungeons, thousand-league journeys, and loveable fools. The majority of these stories contain encounters…

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Bulfinch’s Mythology, Legends of Charlemagne

Bulfinch's Mythology, Legends of Charlemagne

Thomas Bulfinch

This is the third and last part of Bulfinch’s Mythology, the previous two being The Age of Fable, or Stories of Gods and Heroes, and The Age of Chivalry, or Legends of King Arthur. Chapters include: The Peers, Or Paladins; The Tournament; The Siege Of Albracca; Adventures Of Rinaldo And Orlando; The Invasion Of France; Bradamante And Rogero; Astolpho And The Enchantress; The Orc; Astolpho’s Adventures Continued…

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Bulfinch’s Mythology, The Age of Chivalry

Bulfinch's Mythology, The Age of Chivalry

Thomas Bulfinch

The Age of Chivalry, or Legends of King Arthur is the second book in Bulfinch’s Mythology, the first being The Age of Fable, or Stories of Gods and Heroes, and the third and last one being, Legends of Charlemagne, or Romance of the Middle Ages. Chapters include: The Mythical History of England; Arthur; Caradoc Briefbras; Or Caradoc With The Shrunken Arm; Sir Gawain; Launcelot Of The Lake; The Story Of Tristram…

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Bulfinch’s Mythology, The Age of Fable

Bulfinch's Mythology, The Age of Fable

Thomas Bulfinch

The Age of Fable, or Stories of Gods and Heroes is the first part of Bulfinch’s Mythology, the other two being The Age of Chivalry, or Legends of King Arthur, and, Legends of Charlemagne, or Romance of the Middle Ages. Chapters include: Prometheus and Pandora; Apollo and Daphne — Pyramus and Thisbe — Cephalus and Procris; Juno and Her Rivals, Io and Callisto — Diana and Actaeon — Latona and the Rustics…

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The Evil Eye; Or, The Black Spectre

The Evil Eye; Or, The Black Spectre

William Carleton

From the Preface: ‘There is very little to be said about this book in the shape of a preface. The superstition of the Evil Eye is, and has been, one of the most general that ever existed among men. It may puzzle philosophers to ask why it prevails wherever mankind exist . There is not a country on the face of the earth where a belief in the influence of the Evil Eye does not prevail. In my own young days it was a settled dogma of belief…

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Indian Why Stories

Indian Why Stories

Frank B.Linderman

A collection of Native American stories. Chapters include: Why The Chipmunk’s Back Is Striped; How The Ducks Got Their Fine Feathers; Why The Kingfisher Always Wears A War-Bonnet; Why The Curlew S Bill Is Long And Crooked; Old-Man Remarks The World; Why Blackfeet Never Kill Mice; How The Otter Skin Became Great “Medicine”; Old-Man Steals The Sun’s Leggings; Old-Man And His Conscience; Old-Man’s Treachery; Why The Night…

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Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

Kenneth G. T. Webster and W. A. Neilson

This is a late 14th-century Middle English chivalric romance and one of the best known Arthurian stories. Interpreted by some as a representation of the Green Man of folklore and by others as an allusion to Christ, it draws on Welsh, Irish, and English stories, as well as the French chivalric tradition. It tells the tale of how Sir Gawain, a knight of King Arthur’s Round Table, accepts a challenge from a mysterious “Green Knight” who challenges…

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The Cattle Raid of Cualnge

The Cattle Raid of Cualnge

L. Winifred Faraday

One of the masterpieces of Irish literature, this is a translation of a story cycle which lies at the core of the saga of Cuchulainn, the son of the God Lug and the daughter of the king of Ulster. Cuchulainn had the strength of Hercules, but was slow in gaining control over his powers, which turned him into a monster, leaving a trail of mayhem in his wake. At the age of seventeen, still beardless…

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Siegfried and The Twilight of the Gods

Siegfried and The Twilight of the Gods

Richard Wagner

In the second part of Margaret Armour’s translation of possibly Wagner’s best-known work ‘The Ring of the Nibelung’, the last two opera’s in the cycle, ‘Siegfried’ and ‘The Twilight of the Gods’, are reproduced with colour plates by Arthur Rackham. Rackham’s hauntingly dark illustrations, are perfectly suited to the drama – an epic story that charts the struggles of gods, heroes and mythical creatures…

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Curious Myths of the Middle Ages

Curious Myths of the Middle Ages

Sabine Baring-Gould

A collection of twelve myths from the Middle Ages: The Wandering Jew; Prester John; The Divining Rod; The Seven Sleepers Of Ephesus; William Tell; The Dog Gellert; Tailed Men; Antichrist And Pope Joan; The Man In The Moon; The Mountain Of Venus; Fatality Of Numbers; and, The Terrestrial Paradise.

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