The Gambler

The Gambler

Fyodor Dostoyevsky

The Gambler is a short novel by Fyodor Dostoevsky about a young tutor in the employment of a formerly wealthy Russian general. The novella reflects Dostoevsky’s own addiction to roulette, which was in more ways than one the inspiration for the book: Dostoevsky completed the novella under a strict deadline to pay off gambling debts.

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Childhood

Childhood

Leo Tolstoy

Childhood was the first published novel by Leo Tolstoy, released under the initials L. N. in the November 1852 issue of the popular Russian literary journal The Contemporary. It is the first in a series of three novels and is followed by Boyhood and Youth. Published when Tolstoy was just twenty-three years old, the book was an immediate success, earning notice from other Russian novelists including…

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War and Peace

War and Peace

Leo Tolstoy

War and Peace centers broadly on Napoleon’s invasion of Russia in 1812 and follows three of the best-known characters in literature: Pierre Bezukhov, the illegitimate son of a count who is fighting for his inheritance and yearning for spiritual fulfillment; Prince Andrei Bolkonsky, who leaves behind his family to fight in the war against Napoleon; and Natasha Rostov, the beautiful young daughter of a…

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Dead Souls

Dead Souls

Nikolai Vasilievich Gogol

Since its publication in 1842, Dead Souls has been celebrated as a supremely realistic portrait of provincial Russian life. Chichikov, combs the back country wheeling and dealing for “dead souls” (deceased serfs who still represent money to anyone sharp enough to trade in them), and we are introduced to a Dickensian cast of peasants, landowners, and conniving petty officials, few of whom can resist the seductive illogic…

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Uncle Vanya

Uncle Vanya

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

Uncle Vanya was first published in 1897 and received its Moscow première in 1899 in a production by the Moscow Art Theatre. The play portrays the visit of an elderly professor and his glamorous, much younger second wife, Yeléna, to the rural estate that supports their urban lifestyle. Two friends, Vanya, brother of the Professor’s late first wife, who has long managed the estate, and Astrov, the local Doctor, both fall under…

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The Seagull

The Seagull

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

The Seagull is a play by Russian dramatist Anton Chekhov, written in 1895 and first produced in 1896. The Seagull is generally considered to be the first of his four major plays. It dramatises the romantic and artistic conflicts between four characters: the famous middlebrow story writer Boris Trigorin, the ingenue Nina, the fading actress Irina Arkadina, and her son the symbolist playwright Konstantin Tréplev.

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The Schoolmistress and Other Stories

The Schoolmistress and Other Stories

Anton Pavlovich Chekhov

This is Volume 9 of the Tales of Chekhov with 21 short stories, including: The Schoolmistress; A Nervous Breakdown; Misery; Champagne; After The Theatre; A Lady’s Story; In Exile; The Cattle-Dealers; Sorrow; On Official Duty; The First-Class Passenger; A Tragic Actor; A Transgression; Small Fry; The Requiem; In The Coach-House; Panic Fears; The Bet; The Head-Gardener’s Story; The Beauties; and, The Shoemaker And The Devil.

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