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Agamemnon

Agamemnon

Aeschylus

Agamemnon tells the story of the homecoming of Agamemnon, King of Argos, from the Trojan War. Waiting at home for him is his wife, Clytemnestra, who has been planning his murder as revenge for the sacrifice of their daughter, Iphigenia. Furthermore, in the ten years of Agamemnon’s absence, Clytemnestra has entered into an adulterous relationship…

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Ajax

Ajax

Sophocles

Sophocles’s Ajax is a Greek tragedy written in the 5th century BC. The date of Ajax’s first performance is unknown and may never be found, but most scholars regard it as an early work, circa 450 – 430 B.C. It chronicles the fate of the warrior Ajax after the events of the Iliad, but before the end of the Trojan War.

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Alcestis

Alcestis

Euripides

Alcestis is an Athenian tragedy by the ancient Greek playwright Euripides. It was first produced at the City Dionysia festival in 438 BCE. Euripides presented it as the final part of a tetralogy of unconnected plays in the competition of tragedies, for which he won second prize. In the play’s prologue, the god Apollo comes out from Admetus’ palace in…

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Andromache

Andromache

Euripides

During the Trojan War, Achilles killed Andromache’s husband Hector. The Greeks threw Andromache and Hector’s child Astyanax from the Trojan walls for fear that he would grow up and avenge his father and city. Andromache was made a slave of Achilles’ son Neoptolemus. Euripides dramatised these events ten years after Andromache in his tragedy The Trojan…

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Antigone

Antigone

Sophocles

Antigone is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before 441 BC. Chronologically, it is the third of the three Theban plays but was written first. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes ends.

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The Apology

The Apology

Plato

The Apology is Plato’s version of the speech given by Socrates as he defended himself in 399 BC against the charges of ‘corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel’. “The Apology” here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the word “apologia”) of speaking in defense…

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The Argonautica

The Argonautica

Apollonius

The Argonautica tells the story of the journey of Jason and the Argonauts to the land of Colchis in search of the Golden Fleece. The story of the Argonauts was a traditional cycle of myths which Apollonius of Rhodes wove into this saga at the turn of the third century BCE. Apollonius, born about 270 BC, was a librarian at the great Library…

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The Categories

The Categories

Aristotle

The Categories is a text from Aristotle’s Organon that enumerates all the possible kinds of things that can be the subject or the predicate of a proposition. The work is brief enough to be divided, not into books as is usual with Aristotle’s works, but into fifteen chapters. The Categories places every object of human apprehension under…

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The Choephori

The Choephori

Aeschylus

Many years after king Agamemnon’s murder at the hands of his wife Clytamnestra and her lover Aigisthos, his son Orestes returns home with Pylades to mourn at his grave. He has been living in exile and has come back to Argos in secret; his mission is to avenge Agamemnon’s death.

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Critias

Critias

Plato

Critias, one of Plato’s late dialogues, contains the story of the mighty island kingdom Atlantis and its attempt to conquer Athens, which failed due to the ordered society of the Athenians. Critias is the second of a projected trilogy of dialogues, preceded by Timaeus and followed by Hermocrates. The latter was possibly never written and Critias…

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Crito

Crito

Plato

Crito is a dialogue by the ancient Greek philosopher Plato. It is a conversation between Socrates and his wealthy friend Crito regarding justice, injustice, and the appropriate response to injustice. Socrates thinks that injustice may not be answered with injustice, and refuses Crito’s offer to finance his escape from prison. This dialogue…

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Cupid and Psyche

Apuleius

Cupid and Psyche is a story from the Latin novel Metamorphoses, also known as The Golden Ass, written in the 2nd century AD by Apuleius. It concerns the overcoming of obstacles to the love between Psyche (“Soul” or “Breath of Life”) and Cupid (“Desire”), and their ultimate union in a sacred marriage.

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The Cyclops

The Cyclops

Euripides

The Cyclops is an Ancient Greek satyr play by Euripides, the only complete satyr play that has survived. It is a comical burlesque-like play on a story that occurs in book nine of Homer’s Odyssey. Odysseus has lost his way on the voyage home from the Trojan War. He and his hungry crew make a stop in Sicily at Mount Aetna, which is inhabited by…

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