Hesiod, Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

Hesiod, Homeric Hymns, and Homerica

Hugh G. Evelyn White

Hesiod was an epic poet apparently of the eighth century BC. He was regarded by later Greeks as a contemporary of Homer. This book contains his poems, including; The Marriage of Ceyx; The Astronomy; The Divination by Birds; and, The Melampodia. It also contains; the Homeric hymns to the gods; The Epigrams of Homer; and The Epic Cycle (The War of the Titans, The Story of Oedipus, The Aethiopis, etc).

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Politics

Politics

Aristotle

Twenty-three centuries after its compilation, ‘The Politics’ still has much to contribute to this central question of political science. Aristotle’s thorough and carefully argued analysis is based on a study of over 150 city constitutions, covering a huge range of political issues in order to establish which types of constitution are best – both ideally and in particular circumstances – and how they may be maintained.

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The Apology

The Apology

Plato

The Apology is Plato’s version of the speech given by Socrates as he defended himself in 399 BC against the charges of ‘corrupting the young, and by not believing in the gods in whom the city believes, but in other daimonia that are novel’. “The Apology” here has its earlier meaning (now usually expressed by the word “apologia”) of speaking in defense of a cause or of one’s beliefs or actions. The Apology begins…

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Apollonius Of Tyana

Apollonius Of Tyana

G. R. S. Mead

Apollonius Of Tyana was an ancient Greek philosopher. This book, published in 1901, does its best to discover who Apollonius really was. Mead delves into his early life, looking at his biographer, the texts and literature about him, his sayings and sermons, and his writings and letters. A short book, but one which gives valuable insight into one of the most famous philoshopers of ancient time.

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Antigone

Antigone

Sophocles

Antigone is a tragedy by Sophocles written in or before 441 BC. Chronologically, it is the third of the three Theban plays but was written first. The play expands on the Theban legend that predated it and picks up where Aeschylus’ Seven Against Thebes ends.

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Andromache

Andromache

Euripides

During the Trojan War, Achilles killed Andromache’s husband Hector. The Greeks threw Andromache and Hector’s child Astyanax from the Trojan walls for fear that he would grow up and avenge his father and city. Andromache was made a slave of Achilles’ son Neoptolemus. Euripides dramatised these events ten years after Andromache in his tragedy The Trojan Women (415 BC). Years pass and Andromache has a child with Neoptolemus…

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Ancient Art and Ritual

Ancient Art and Ritual

Jane Harrison

Illustrated. Chapters include; Art and Ritual; Primitive Ritual: Pantomimic Dances; Seasonal Rites: The Spring Festival; The Spring Festival in Greece; Transition From Ritual To Art; Greek Sculpture; and, Ritual, Art and Life.

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Alcestis

Alcestis

Euripides

Alcestis is an Athenian tragedy by the ancient Greek playwright Euripides. It was first produced at the City Dionysia festival in 438 BCE. Euripides presented it as the final part of a tetralogy of unconnected plays in the competition of tragedies, for which he won second prize. In the play’s prologue, the god Apollo comes out from Admetus’ palace in Pherae (modern Velestino in Magnesia), dressed in white and carrying…

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Ajax

Ajax

Sophocles

Sophocles’s Ajax is a Greek tragedy written in the 5th century BC. The date of Ajax’s first performance is unknown and may never be found, but most scholars regard it as an early work, circa 450 – 430 B.C. It chronicles the fate of the warrior Ajax after the events of the Iliad, but before the end of the Trojan War.

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Agamemnon

Agamemnon

Aeschylus

Agamemnon tells the story of the homecoming of Agamemnon, King of Argos, from the Trojan War. Waiting at home for him is his wife, Clytemnestra, who has been planning his murder as revenge for the sacrifice of their daughter, Iphigenia. Furthermore, in the ten years of Agamemnon’s absence, Clytemnestra has entered into an adulterous relationship with Aegisthus, Agamemnon’s cousin and the scion of a dispossessed branch of the family…

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